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World Human intelligence Quotient is the Non Profit Organisation

 

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The Binet Siman Scale

After Galton’s work, two French scientists named Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon devised a new way to measure intelligence called the “Binet-Simon Scale”.

This test measured someone’s intelligence using the “performance method”, which involved testing intelligence based upon someone’s ability to give correct answers to a series of questions

To help compare intelligences between different types of people, the Binet-Simon Scale used a measure called “mental age” (MA).

French psychology Alfred Binet and a colleague, Theodore Simon, produced the forerunner of the modern intelligence test. In 1904, the Binet and Simon began a project to identify the test or the method by which the French Government will come to know about theory to identify the “Dull” Children-Slow Children-Slow Learners. Binet and Simon then introduce the processes such as attention, perception, memory, numerical reasoning, and verbal comprehension. Binets early observations convinced him that the age plays the vital role in intelligence and the older and adolescents should be able to perform a wider variety of intellectual and intelligence task rather than their younger counter parts.

In overall, the Binet had created a test that enabled him to identify the relationship between the Mental Age and Chronological Age to estimate their levels of intellectual developmental as comparison of Mental Age.

Psychologist Robert Sternberg defined intelligence as "mental activity directed toward purposive adaptation to, selection and shaping of, real-world environments relevant to one’s life." While he agreed with others that intelligence is much broader than a single, general ability.

His proposed 'successful intelligence,' which is comprised of three different factors:

Analytical intelligence This component refers to problem-solving abilities.
Creative intelligence This aspect of intelligence involves the ability to deal with new situations using past experiences and current skills.
Practical intelligence This element refers to the ability to adapt to a changing Environment
Analytical intelligence This component refers to problem-solving abilities.
Creative intelligence This aspect of intelligence involves the ability to deal with new situations using past experiences and current skills.
Practical intelligence This element refers to the ability to adapt to a changing Environment


One of the more recent ideas to emerge is Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences. Instead of focusing on the analysis of test scores, Gardner proposed that numerical expressions of human intelligence are not a full and accurate depiction of people's abilities. His theory describes eight distinct intelligences that are based on skills and abilities that are valued within different cultures

The eight intelligences Gardner described are:
  • Visual-spatial Intelligence
  • Verbal-linguistic Intelligence
  • Bodily-kinesthetic Intelligence
  • Logical-mathematical Intelligence
  • Interpersonal Intelligence
  • Musical Intelligence
  • Intra personal Intelligence
  • Naturalistic Intelligence

British psychologist Charles Spearman (1863-1945) described a concept he referred to as general intelligence, or the g factor. After using a technique known as factor analysis to examine a number of mental aptitude tests, Spearman concluded that scores on these tests were remarkably similar. People who performed well on one cognitive test tended to perform well on other tests, while those who scored badly on one test tended to score badly on others. He concluded that intelligence is general cognitive ability that could be measured and numerically expressed.

Psychologist Louis L. Thurstone (1887-1955) offered a differing theory of intelligence. Instead of viewing intelligence as a single, general ability, Thurstone's theory focused on seven different "primary mental abilities." The abilities that he described were:
  • Verbal comprehension
  • Reasoning
  • Perceptual speed
  • Numerical ability
  • Word fluency
  • Associative memory
  • Spatial visualization